Roleplaying

Last week, someone posted on an SD boardgaming meetup that he wanted to get a group to play a Gamma World campaign.  Even though my pen-and-paper roleplaying has been limited, it sounded fun, and I went.  (The fact that I had been talking to someone on okc about Pathfinder had nothing to do with it.)  We spent most of the night making characters.  The GM was inexperienced and railroaded the group while mumbling a lot, and the group was big and unwieldy, but I did have coming up with my character, even if it was largely determined by dice: he’s a human that has embraced mutations who can zap people with electricity even though his ultravision can see electricity and so he can blind himself.

Overcome with a desire to create more stories, I looked up games like Pathfinder ACG.  Though their character customization and campaign are tops, ultimately I held off buying it because of some reservations about how repetitive the adventures are.

Instead, I started digging around actual RPG adventures.  The ones that really interested me the most were Eureka: 501 Adventures and Villainy Amok, both of which are really books of tropes.  (501 Adventures has a companion, Masks: 1001 Memorable NPCs.)  I also bought Operation Rimfire because I heard it was a good mecha based campaign (it’s basically a 20+ episode anime in adventure form).

The system that interested me the most was the derivatives of the Gumshoe system, like Ashen Stars.  The system is designed to avoid the problem with mysteries in RPGs where the players flub a die roll and miss out on a clue.  Gumshoe games provide the players with all the necessary clues, and the game is about the investigation and putting together the mystery.  Sadly, I don’t like any of the genres, otherwise I might try to mine their adventures for ideas.

In other news, Primetime Adventures had their latest printing successfully Kickstarted.  Fate, a system that was developed from Fudge, was also Kickstarted.  I like these stripped down games, where the players rather than the game mechanics bring the characters and story to life.

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